Fundraising for Charlie

Published: 22/05/2019

Each year we enjoy fundraising for good causes and this year we are focussing on three special cancer charities. Early last year, Care Manager Nicky Beadle’s youngest son, Charlie, was diagnosed with a brain tumour and since then has been receiving treatment.

Each year we enjoy fundraising for good causes and this year we are focussing on three special cancer charities. Early last year, Care Manager Nicky Beadle’s youngest son, Charlie, was diagnosed with a brain tumour and since then has been receiving treatment.

Charlie, who is 11 years old, has already undergone a number of operations in England and is doing well.  Following a recent MRI scan, Charlie’s Consulting team recommended ‘Proton Beam Therapy’ – a type of radiotherapy used to treat tumours in the brain – which is less damaging to surrounding healthy tissue.

Nicky will travel to the U.S with Charlie later this month so that he can undergo the therapy in Jacksonville, Florida. It is regarded as being at the forefront in the treatment of brain tumours, with very encouraging results, so we are excited about Charlie being given the opportunity to benefit from this leading-edge technology.

Nicky, Charlie and eldest son, Harry, are all receiving much-needed support from the following three charities and our fund-raising this year will benefit: We are organising a fund-raising fete in conjunction with Charlie’s school, Lynch Hill School Primary Academy, in Slough, on July 8, as part of a week of events being held at the school, including a non-uniform day, sporting events, raffles and inflatables.

Charlie was diagnosed with a brain tumour after experiencing bouts of severe headaches, sleepiness and vomiting. He underwent an emergency operation to remove fluid build-up, surrounding the tumour and has had to endure further fluid removal.

In August 2015, he was admitted to Southampton General Hospital to undergo an operation to remove cysts. A scheduled six-day stay turned into six weeks after he had a bleed on his brain, followed by a stroke. The part of the brain where his tumour lies is the hypothalamus, which governs functions such as regulating temperature, thirst, hunger, sleep, mood and the release of other hormones. The damage which occurs is irreversible.

During this time, Charlie was fed by tube. He suffered temporary paralysis to the left side of his body and underwent intense physiotherapy to help him eat, communicate and to regain his strength.

Charlie has been left unable to walk very far and uses a wheelchair. He has now returned to school with an adapted timetable and support from full-time teaching assistants. If you would like to make a contribution please go to our JustGiving page.

If you would like to donate, please see the links below to our fundraising pages: