Every Day is Different When You Care

Published: 22/05/2019

The department of Health and Social Care has revealed that an extra 650,000 will be needed by 2035 to look after the rising number of elderly people across the country. 

The department of Health and Social Care has revealed that an extra 650,000 will be needed by 2035 to look after the rising number of elderly people across the country. We sat down with one of our Care Assistants, Kim, to find out why she enjoys working in care so much. 
 
What is a typical day in care like for you?
 
My day starts when I put on my Bluebird Care uniform. If I’m on the morning run, I have a chat and share a cup of tea or coffee with my customer to help make them feel at ease. From here we start their daily routine, it could be showering or just getting them dressed, having breakfast or going down the local paper shop. We are there to assist our customers with household chores and duties, getting up and getting dressed, making breakfast, companionship and to go about their daily routine as they wish.
 
What do you enjoy most about working in care?
 
I enjoy the companionship visits the most, particularly with patients who have dementia. It gives them mental stimulation and helps their brain function and supports with everyday tasks and activities. When we do a social visit we do a lot of crossword puzzles, jigsaws, quizzes and any household object that can stimulate the brain or we can go out and about in the community. I enjoy these because we can be more personal with the customer and build a lasting relationship with them.
 
What is one myth about working in care that you can debunk?
 
A myth about care I could debunk would be that people are led to believe care is just a job. Care isn’t just about carrying out necessary tasks, its about being personal and being there for the customer’s needs both physical and emotional. Some customers might need a friend and others need support.
 
What would you say to someone who is unsure about working in care?
 
I would say it’s something you should try and experience for yourself. As a carer you have the opportunity to learn different skills and you can learn how best to assist people on a day to day basis according to what they need. It teaches you how to use computer software, hoists and other medical equipment like bed pans. It teaches you how to recognise a person’s needs and symptoms when often they can’t recognise them themselves.
 
Can you share an example of where you’ve really felt like you’ve made a difference to someone’s life?
 
I think I’ve made a difference to my dementia customer’s lives. They often wake up in the morning unsure of how to do things and care for themselves. For me, I enjoy working with them the most because I feel like I’m giving them back a portion of their independence they might not have had otherwise.
 
When you finish your shift at the end of the day, how do you feel?
 
At the end of the day, I feel happy that I’ve made a contribution to society and that I’ve made a difference in some way to someone who really needs my help.

                                               

If you would like to join our team, please contact us on 02380 018221 or on southampton@bluebirdcare.co.uk