[BLOG] Living with Prostate Cancer

Published: 22/05/2019

In our latest blog for Prostate Cancer Awareness Month we’re discussing ‘Living with Prostate Cancer’; looking at the impact it has on your life and what help and support there is available.


Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and over 330,000 are living with prostate cancer in the UK.

In our latest blog for Prostate Cancer Awareness Month we’re discussing ‘Living with Prostate Cancer’; looking at the impact it has on your life and what help and support there is available.

Unlike many other types of cancer, most prostate cancers get worse quite slowly. It may be you live with prostate cancer for many years without symptoms and if during this time your cancer has not spread beyond the prostate gland it may not require treatment. However, for the one in five men who have a fast-growing cancer, surgery or radiotherapy to cure the cancer is an option.

Living with prostate cancer will have an impact on your everyday life, work and relationships. Your treatment may mean that you are living with side effects and dealing with the worry about the cancer returning.
 

Impact on everyday activities

If you are experiencing little or no symptoms then you should be able to continuing working, caring for yourself and your family and maintain social and leisure activities.  However, it is understandable that you may feel anxious or worried about what the future holds, and this can have an effect on your sleep and may cause periods of depression.

As prostate cancer progresses, you may not feel well enough to do all the things you used to. After an operation, radiotherapy or chemotherapy, you will probably feel tired and will require time to recover.

It is important to remember that whatever stage your prostate cancer has reached, you give yourself time to do the things you enjoy and take pleasure in, and ensure you spend time with the people you care about and who care about you.

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Cancer Research UK: coping with prostate cancer

 

Impact on relationships

Receiving a diagnosis of prostate cancer can bring families and friends closer but it can also put pressure on these relationships too.

Being open and honest about how you are feeling, what your concerns and worries are may help to put others at ease and give them ideas on how they can help you. However, it is important to remember to tell people if you need some time to yourself.

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Talking to others

Your doctor or nurse should be able to reassure any questions or concerns you have but you may also find it helpful to talk to a trained Psychologies, counsellor or utilise a specialist telephone helpline. Your GP surgery will have information on these.
 
There are local support groups available and some men find it helpful to talk to other men with prostate cancer through an internet chat room.
 
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Money and financial support

If the time comes when you have to reduce or stop work because of your prostate cancer, this will have a financial implication on your life and you may find it hard to cope financially.
 
If you have prostate cancer or are caring for someone with prostate cancer, you may be entitled to financial support.
 
  • If you have a job but cannot work because of your prostate cancer, you are entitled to Statutory Sick Pay from your employer.
  • If you do not have a job and cannot work because of your prostate cancer, you may be entitled to Employment and Support Allowance.
  • If you are caring for someone with prostate cancer, you may be entitled to Carer’s Allowance.
 
To find out what help is available to you, speak to the social worker at your hospital, who can give you the information you need.
 
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